USA

Between 1984 and 1991, Luz International Limited built and commissioned the world’s first commercial CSP plants in the Mojave Desert, California. The SEGS plants consist of nine solar power plants using parabolic trough technology with an aggregate capacity of 354 MW. These plants are still operating and the power produced is purchased by Southern California Edison (SCE) for about 6 cents per kWh.

Plant Name

Location

Operation

Net Output (MWe)

Solar Field Area (m2)

SEGS I

Daggett, CA

1984

13.8

82,960

SEGS II

Daggett, CA

1985

30

190,338

SEGS III

Kramer Junction, CA

1986

30

230,300

SEGS IV

Kramer Junction, CA

1986

30

230,300

SEGS V

Kramer Junction, CA

1987

30

250,500

SEGS VI

Kramer Junction, CA

1988

30

188,000

SEGS VII

Kramer Junction, CA

1988

30

194,280

SEGS VIII

Harper Lake, CA

1989

80

464,340

SEGS IX

Harper Lake, CA

1990

80

483,960

In 2006, Solargenix Energy built the Saguaro plant in Tucson, Arizona. This 1 MW demonstration plant provided great experience for the subsequent build of Nevada Solar One (NSO).

In June 2007, Nevada Solar One went to operation in Boulder City, Nevada, being the largest CSP project built in the United States since 1991. With a nominal capacity of 64 MW, NSO produces annually more than 130 GWh. The power plant is composed of 357,000 m2 of second generation parabolic trough collectors (SGX2) developed by Solargenix Energy with the collaboration of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

During 2008 and 2009 three prototype plants were developed:

  • Kimberlina, a 5 MW Fresnel plant in Bakersfield, California.
  • Holaniku, a 2 MW microCSP plant in Keahole Point, Hawaii.
  • Sierra Sun, a 5 MW water/steam multi-tower plant in Lancaster, California.

Currently, 5 large-scale projects with an aggregate capacity of around 1.3 GW are scheduled for completion between 2013 and 2014: Ivanpah, Genesis, Solana, Crescent Dunes and Abengoa Mojave.

Information about the CSP plants developed in the United States